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Modernism Gallery

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02-01-02-11

02-01-02-11

01-03-02-08

01-03-02-08

02-01-04-06

02-01-04-06

02-01-01-13

02-01-01-13

01-03-02-10

01-03-02-10

01-04-02-05

01-04-02-05

01-03-03-17

01-03-03-17

02-01-02-11

02-01-02-11

01-03-02-08

01-03-02-08

02-01-04-06

02-01-04-06

02-01-01-13

02-01-01-13

01-03-02-10

01-03-02-10

01-04-02-05

01-04-02-05

01-03-03-17

01-03-03-17

Introduction
 

To the web site author, modernism photography is characterized by simple, bold compositions with strong, clean lines.

Chair and Window
 

This image works better with strong, direct sunlight.  I revisited this scene on an overcast day and the colors were not as rich and vibrant.

Tracks, Branch and Snow
 

Exposure metering was of the snow and adjusted to render the snow white.  Maintaining the proper contrast was difficult because contrast ranged from sunlit snow to the shadow side of the young tree.  It was important to maintain detail both in the shadow side of the tree and in the snow.

White Walls
 

The stark white walls contrasted beautifully with the clear blue sky.  The brown gutter strengthened the vertical design of the image.

Red Tile Roof
 

The aerial perspective and strong, directional light gives definition to the tiles.

The Last Leaf
 

I came across this young shrub (less than 12 inches, or 30 cm, tall) after a snow fall. What intrigued me about this shrub was the bonsai like shape and the very small leaf on the left side.

Red Dawn
 

I composed this stormy image so the rising sun was above the V shape in the tree line.

Sand Pattern
 

The subject is not the sea shell.  The shell is there to give scale and an entry point.  From there, the viewer can leisurely scan the patterns made by the gray and black sand.