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Flowers Gallery

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01-02-04-01

01-02-04-01

01-02-01-15

01-02-01-15

01-02-05-01

01-02-05-01

01-02-04-05

01-02-04-05

01-02-06-19

01-02-06-19

01-02-07-17

01-02-07-17

01-02-07-12

01-02-07-12

01-02-05-06

01-02-05-06

01-02-07-06

01-02-07-06

01-02-02-14

01-02-02-14

01-02-07-18

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01-01-03-06

Introduction
 

My mother had an intense love of flowers.  I inherited some of this passion and carry it on in my photography and gardening.

Even the smallest aperture could not keep the entire scene in focus.  So I made sure the foreground and mid ground were in focus and allowed the background to go slightly out of focus.  The image was composed so several of the day lilies were prominent in the foreground.

This is actually both a color and black and white image.  In Photoshop, I masked the flowers and turned the gate black and white.  I then used two tones on the gate.  A gray tone on the wood and a sepia tone on the metal hinge.

Various black and white tones are on the Downloads page.

I waited until early morning to take this photograph so there would be dew on the flowers.  When composing, I ensured I used fresh flowers and not older blooms whose petals would show brown spots.

When metering, I was careful to allow the petals to render white but not so white as to lose the details.

The blue sky, green pines, yellow forsythia and the pastel magenta of the redbud flowers make this a colorful image.

I used a polarizing filter to enhance the sky and to remove most of the glare from the vegetation.

Botanical gardens are good places to photograph flowers because you will be able to see many species in one area.

When composing, I paid particular attention to the background.  I wanted a background that would be darker that the flower, be out of focus and have smooth tones.

This was intentionally composed so the second flower in the mid ground was right behind the main flower.

Even with strong, direct sunlight, this water lily looks attractive.

When optimizing the image, I ensured no adjustment made the yellow in the lily pad in the lower right brighter, as this would distract from the flower.

This was a partly cloudy day.  I waited until the flowers were in dabbled sunlight and the building and trees were in the shadow of a cloud before taking the picture.  If the building were in full sun, its bright red color would become the focal point of the photograph, which is not what I wanted.

This was composed so the leaves and flower would be juxtaposed, with the flower being slightly more dominant.

I found this flower blooming near a stream in my backyard.  Even though the sky was overcast, there was still mottled sunlight coming through the trees.  I used a large diffusion panel to remove the glare.  I composed the image so the filtered sunlight was behind the plant so the fine details on the stalks would be apparent.

Because of the contrast range between the white flowers and the dark shadows, I took my meter reading off an evenly light object not in the scene, then recomposed to take the photograph.

I intentionally did not include the entire tree, its trunk or base in the image.  The dark brown, hard, oval shape of the mulch in lower right offsets the white, loose shape of the flowers in upper right.  The v shaped trunk ties the two together and gives balance to the image.

A black and white version of this photograph is on the Black and White Gallery page.